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Monday, March 25, 2013

This is my story… Joy Elizabeth Turner




Endometriosis. That was the “official” diagnosis. After years of suffering through pain, excessive absences from school/work and extreme fatigue that would often impede upon even the simplest routine, there was finally a “name” to this evil entity that plagued my body. I was told during one procedure, they discovered scarring and adhesions that were situated on a nerve and the risk involved in removing those adhesions could leave me paralyzed from the waist down. Additionally, I’ve always been told that the only “real” remedy to end the endo was through hysterectomy. I wasn’t completely convinced and I also had some doubts about the effectiveness of that particular surgery given the information about the nerve tissue. All of the technical, medical “babble” just frustrated me because I still wasn’t hearing a definite resolution to end my pain.  



Endometriosis. That was the “official” diagnosis. After years of suffering through pain, excessive absences from school/work and extreme fatigue that would often impede upon even the simplest routine, there was finally a “name” to this evil entity that plagued my body. I was told during one procedure, they discovered scarring and adhesion's that were situated on a nerve and the risk involved in removing those adhesion's could leave me paralyzed from the waist down. Additionally, I’ve always been told that the only “real” remedy to end the endo was through hysterectomy. I wasn’t completely convinced and I also had some doubts about the effectiveness of that particular surgery given the information about the nerve tissue. All of the technical, medical “babble” just frustrated me because I still wasn’t hearing a definite resolution to end my pain.

There was a movie out once called the “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” and although I honestly can’t remember much about the plot or script of this film, the title pretty much sums up what it feels like when symptoms of endo are at their worst. I once had a dear 96-year old woman (I was her caregiver at the time) say to me, ”pain makes you a different person.” That phrase stuck with me, it adhered to me like Velcro as I realized that at times my own endo pain had a tendency of altering my mood to the point where I no longer felt like myself. I became someone else whose characteristics embodied irritability, depression, low-tolerance and a bad attitude. And I’m supposed to be a Christian woman, minister of the gospel, strong woman of faith! Yet, I have this “thorn” that I just can’t shake, and when the pain hits… it hits hard. Even with a “mustard seed” of faith left, nothing could dilute, diminish, erase, cover, or hide the fact that yes… I too am in pain. BUT, there is a silver lining to my story. 


My goal as a writer and entrepreneur is to be able to someday coach and counsel other women who have been suffering with endo and other life-altering conditions to create a better balance in their lives through entrepreneurship and tapping into their individual gifts, talents and abilities. My first book “Content…Right Where I Am” was actually born out of my own struggles, which did include this battle with endometriosis. I truly believe that although I may still have symptoms and require pain meds (AND a heating pad from time to time…), I speak healing into my situation and all of my fellow endo sisters. All hope is not loss and together we unite in VICTORY over endo.

Joy & Blessings!

Joy E. Turner


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